About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 6
MSNBCW 5
CNNW 4
KQEH (PBS) 3
LINKTV 2
MSNBC 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
, who wins the award in your block? >> oh, mr. 9-9-9, her man cane. you know, people using a presidential campaign to sell books, to sell themselves, to make that a steppingstone to a much larger career, no one did it better than herman cane -- or worse -- in this case. >> i would say that the worst trend this year was the republican party deciding that they couldn't win the game with the rules as written. so trying to keep people from voting and essentially rig the rules, which is a trenld, unfortunately, that is on going. they've seen the writing on the wall. and they're still trying to say how can we change the math and rig the rules so that we can still win. in virginia, for example, they propose changing the way that electoral votes are awarded so that it would be by congressional district which would unfairly favor republic s republicans. so they're still trying to rig the rules and hold back the tide of the demographics. >> and try to rig the rules in the middle of the game. i've seen them change the rules, but never mid game. at least wait until you lose the game.
mitchell reports" next. chris cillizza is filling in for her. good afternoon, mr. cillizza. >> i don't know what those words mean but assume they're compliments. >> $5 compliments. >> i'll take them. >> coming up next on "andrea mitchell reports," jim demint is out. the tea party leader announces his departure from congress. what does it mean for the senate and the future of the republican party? chuck todd, gop senator leader john barrasso and more. congressman john larson on what role house democrats can play in the budget negotiations. and the latest on the showdown in syria and defense secretary leon panetta's warning for president assad with former ambassador nick burns. male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life op
on behind the scenes with mrs. clinton who is going to resign her secretary of state position soon? >> sure. she's said over and over again she's not going to run and few people believe her, particularly the folks around her. when she does leave her state department post, she's actual will he going to keep a full time paid staff, a few people will be around with her. for at least a year or so. they say she's going to rest and reflect. maybe write a memoir about being the former secretary of state, probably not a book about her loss in 08 to barak obama in which -- which is something she has been considering. insiders say there is no rush in her making up her decision. she could actually join the race late, they argue, in part because she's got big name recognition that the big donors would likely stand on the side lines and freeze the rates for some her rivals as long as she wanted to wait. once she wraps up her time at the state department, do not expect her to hang her hat at her husband, bill clinton's, foundation. insiders say say she has been careful to manage her own emand avoid being
that it is. we really can do without her leadership and support. also, my colleague, mr. tom mcnaught. the work that we have done to not be possible without him. but after the assassination, the taping was dismantled. and everyone said that the secretary mood of the executive office building. the tapes went to a variety of storage locations. robert kennedy actually used them for his book, "thirteen days". there is the reel to reel tapes and the dictaphone. 1983 so we have the first opening, and it is really a fact that the system was actually installed and 62, and 2012, we open and declassify the very last tape. but the entire collection is now open. this book that he had worked on is was the first one to include all of the tapes. >> and if one of these fine people want to go browsing, where would they go? they would go here. >> that's right. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actually come to our research room. some people still com
asking her to commit for events for 2013. the state department has literally said no to everyone. her aides have said don't even try. come back to us next year. she needs time to rest and relax. now, mrs. clinton in interviews has joked about putting her feet up and watching reality tv. but, in fact, she has a more serious set of questions to contemplate. because there is the simple matter of what do you do all day if you're hillary clinton and you don't suddenly have a huge important job to do. she wants to do things like write books. she wants to work on behalf of women and girls. she wants to start to enjoy her life. but the trouble is that it is very hard to make those smaller decisions like what sort of book to write until she makes the big one. because if she's going to run for president, she has to write a very careful book. sort of setting out that possibility. if she wasn't going to run, we could finally read the hillary clinton has seen it all book that some day she might like to write. >> nothing that could be used against her. a new george washington university/politico ba
viewers, bya because you asked now. they write this out of kentucky, when is mrs. clinton expected to testify about her role in the benghazi attacks on our consulate. a second question, were there any witnesses that survived the attack and when will we hear their testimony. secretary clinton you mentioned her, will that happen or not? >> she has said she will testify but only after the internal report investigation is done. i think she should testify immediately. but we have not heard her testimony yet and i think that's got to be a priority. when it comes to those witnesses, there were witnesses there. they were interviewed by the fbi. those interview reports have obviously not been made public, first of all, but also my last understanding is that the intelligence committee was still waiting to receive some of those reports. bill: why would they not share that with you? its that a risk. >> i think if they could be shared with me in a classified setting, i review information in the classified setting all the time and obviously have to protect that information. but most importantly
of legislation to come back to the house that she has on her agenda. mr. sessions: the gentleman is correct and we expect those. mr. woodall: this is the kind of house, deliberative house, i came to be part of two short years ago. we have the ability to get these things done in the next few days. i reject the idea that i read over and over again that this house has been delaying action this house got it right wetch got it right in a budget in april of 2011, we got it right in our budget in 2012, we got it right when we passed aest sequester replacement and we're getting it right with this rule today. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, our leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are w
to her. >> ticket, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise in support of his resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, connecticut, and to offer condolences of the family members and members of the community. i join him in saluting the courage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children in their care. to thank the first responders to a live on the scene who not only got survivors to safety but to end the succession of killings happening. those first responders leave their home every day knowing they are going to face danger and they did that day as well. in the face of it, they were heroic, as were the teachers and counselors. this is all the meat to cook -- this has all been laid clear to us. congressman murphy, senator collect murphy, who represents this district would such a distinction and compassion. congressman courtney, congressman john larson, jim hines. all of them spoke with such beauty at our service earlier. the candlelight service. it was so moving to hear their connection to the people there. the president s
and politically savvy. >> madison loved every minute of it. mrs. byrne -- mrs. monroe hated it. >> she warned her husband. you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it with a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and make it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i'm constantly reminded about all of the people who lived there before and particularly, all of the women. >> fi
here. mr. adelson, how much mon are you going to spend on the election? >> i did not touch her. she ran back into me. she just grabbed our camera. >> i know you were against the war in iraq, that is ok -- but you thought the war in afghanistan was -- was ok -- you thought that was worth doing. we did not check with the russians to see how they did there for 10 years. [laughter] but we did it. it was -- you know -- it was something -- to be thought about. >> when david koch sat down last night as a member of the u.s. delegation, i went over to ask a question. >> do you think unchecked concentration of wealth will undermine democracy? >> i could not quite hear you. i am deaf in one ear. >> we are not doing any interviews. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. [laughter] [applause] and to heal the planet. [laughter] my promise is to help you and your family. >> one of the first acts of civil disobedience at the democratic national convention took place on tuesday just outside the time warner cable center. >> we are here to ask president obama, who we need a p
. >> well, thank you for everything, mr. moyers, thank you. >> the latest book is "this is how you lose her." junot diaz, thank you very much. >> thank you, sir. >> that's it for this week. happy new year to you all. on the 3rd of january, you'll get a chance to talk with junot diaz and ask him your own questions in a live chat. that's at our website, billmoyers.com, on thursday, january 3rd, 1:00 pm eastern time. and take a look at our latest edition of group think. we've asked some editors to choose the most important but under-reported stories of 2012. that's all at billmoyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here, next year. >>> don't wait a week to get more moyers. visit billmoyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode of "moyers & company" is available on dvd for $19.95. to order, call 1-800-336-1917. or write to the address on your screen. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent pr
. >> whether i had a camera or not and i was running towards it, there is no way i could have rescued mr. han. >> i'll talk with congresswoman schwartz last week calling on mr. boehner to meet with the president. now that he has, what are we are her thoughts? you can join us our conversation on twitter. ♪ the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost.. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. >>> welcome back. police say the suspect in monday's new york ci
to change. jody canter wrote this in "the new york times," mrs. clinton may find that her freedom comes with one huge constraint. the more serious she is about 2016, the less she can do, no frank, seen it all memoir, no clients, commissions or controversial positions that could prove problematic. now, i'm one of the so called smart guys that david was talking about. i think she is going to run. i think she wants to be the first woman president of the united states. she's going to have to be cautious in what she does over the next year or two. >> any candidate has to be cautious. >> well, if she's never going to run for office again, she doesn't have to be cautious. >> she's well known. people know her across the board. there are a sizable number of republicans who like her. the reason why people like her is because they know she's a principled person. somebody who believes in human rights. equality of all people. she'd make a terrific president of the united states. i don't think she has to be confined by those limitations miss canter wrote in her article. >> the problems we face in 201
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
of the country turned to something else. it's interesting. if you look at 1968, mrs. johnson, lady bird johnson, wrote in her diary, there are so many people across this country who are asking what is happening to us. president johnson felt that as well, and that's when he moved on gun control. and i think, again, that if president obama wanted to use this moment he must do so i think with great swiftness. >> can i just ask you about the lbj library, which i understand opened yesterday, reopened after a big old renovation? what do you guys have there? >> well, we have a $10 million redesign of our core exhibit on president johnson. one of the wonderful things about the exhibit is we use the telephone recordings that were done throughout the course of president johnson's administration to help tell the story of this very consequential and important president. >> well, i think that's great. i also understand you have historians doris kerns good win and mark besh losh, michael beschlo beschloss, who are good friends of this show. we love to come and hear them. good to speak with you, mark updegrov
there is a tendency to form that blood clot. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed, fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general, it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes, again, you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder, a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is, for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause, the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are condition
. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes again you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are conditions when it is unlimited. so to some
adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe mated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you couldn't move without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during this statement, you are a little breathless and it was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> he is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. >> they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now, you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i am
is your favorite one now? >> the one that we used to go to mrs. then san francisco where one of my daughters' lives. they closed but she found another one and the name might cannot remember but it is on the main drag right before her city hall i will think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i enjoyed your book american stories i a understand only basically they were derived from newspaper headlines? >> from going to wherever i was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines maybe that is how i found out about them? >> there must have an idea is you pursued that did not turn into a story. were there any that came out of the process? >> i went to a place because somebody phone to me or wrote to me a letter i usually ended up with that story. almost always been just about everything is in their better or worse. >> do you have any insight with u.s. providence -- president has of preference for a dog as a family pet? [laughter] maybe they never met a cat that they like. [applause] more questions? >> as a little christmas gift could you give us
? >> it bothers me because it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense is something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he is crazy? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: call him crazy. but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt, that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone, it has collected 7.7 milli$7.7 million, about 90 million since it was established. but $90 million is not that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since 1992, when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the debt. the depression-era kid and army vet says he wants to give back to a country that has given him so much, a feeling that is infectious. he knows his money wouldn't avert the fiscal c
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
close to me in keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country. and we all cherish her, as she continues to be active and continues to play a role here at the library. so i couldn't come here, and i mentioned nancy fortissimo their aisles with say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years. from being made in san diego to u.s. senator to governor, to a leader in a variety of ways. i look to pete wilson and to gale as great people who represent the willingness to serve the state and the country in an important way. i want to say, it's always a family engagement if you're out there, thank you both for serving the country but it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] >> i did not you would be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here. callista and i have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know, and we made a movie called ronald reagan -- i want to recognize tonight kevin and his wife are here. kevin w
only protect himself or herself, but one who can change the market. >> mr. chairman, i give up. >> well, warren left washington, but not for long. after president obama took her out of the running for the job, she went back to massachusetts, ran for senate, and won. so she's back in washington. and ready to add to her legend as the sheriff there to protect your money. and this time republican senators can't do a thing about it. warren is a fierce advocates for consumers and believes the amount of risks banks take should be regulated. on friday, we'll get our first post election look at how many jobs are being created. and the early forecasts are not good. cnn money forecasts just 77,000 net jobs created in november. that's far fewer than the 171,000 that were added in october. a lot happened last month. superstorm sandy, labor turmoil at hostess and business uncertainty because our elected officials won't get their act together and deal with the fiscal cliff. brace yourself for a job number that could be even lower than the already weak forecast. i hope i am wrong about that. from the c
and worked as a photojournalist. she is here with her husband and she follows her father to the chautauqua stage. he spoke here when he was minority leader of the u.s. house of representatives. lynda johnson robb is the first child of lyndon johnson and lady bird johnson. [laughter] mrs. robb has served for 44 years and is now chairman emeritus. she was appointed by president jimmy carter to serve as chair of the president's advisory committee for women. she put her own career, including as a contributing editor @ "ladies' home journal" on hold to work with her husband on his successful virginia and the minute choral candidacy. as virginia's first lady, she launched and chaired the grid kenya district -- the virginia history project. she is here with her husband who has always been here before and her daughter and grandchildren. previously, a columnist and associate editor for "the new york sun" and chief speechwriter for read giuliani -- for rudy giuliani, he was responsible for writing the eulogies for the firefighters and fresh responders who died on 9/11. evelyn is also editor of the a
's something i think you'll see reflected in the work. >> i can tell you, i know mrs. o'malley. she's judge o'malley. she wouldn't care if you keep calling. i'll call her now and say are you in for the program. she'd say yes. in all seriousness, first of all, you are a creative administrator both of you are. so i won't prolong the generosity of the chair in having me participate here. but i -- it is my hope and my prayer for my community that's affected we would think the bridge during the hard time for individual families how we look at economic development. i would invite you as assessing what the governor submit if you could consider visiting us to lock at what this is so we cannot only respond we can also lay the groundwork for reform to be able to help our community that are hard hit and hard -- what are so terrific. >> thank you, senator. thanks very much. >> thank you so much for holding the hearing and the tremendous work on the critical issue. obviously i'm not from a state impacted by the hurricane or the one that impacted you. as an american we have to come together. we learn from
to her, and i believe that is the kind of leadership to help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator? >> thank you. thank you for your testimony today mr. secretary. i know the senator asked about reverse mortgages. i am concerned about that issue. i am particularly concerned that $2.80 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related. can you talk a little more about why these losses are so severe? >> here is the fundamental problem, without getting into yoo-hoo t -- into too much detail. the loans were generally variable rate and allowed the bar were -- borrower. there is basically no option for them to do anything but draw the full amount. >> why? >> we do not have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes to the program to allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking to be made. our alternative, and i was just discussing this, we could basically eliminate or put a moratorium on our regular program, which is somewhat safer. the problem is we do not have that authority under that program to avoid the full-draw feature of it. t
that she took. i listened to her, and i believe that is the kind of leadership to help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator? >> thank you. thank you for your testimony today mr. secretary. i know the senator asked about reverse mortgages. i am concerned about that issue. i am particularly concerned that $2.80 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related. can you talk a little more about why these losses are so severe? >> here is the fundamental problem, without getting into too much detail. the loans were generally variable rate and allowed the borrower. there is basically no option for them to do anything but draw the full amount. >> why? >> we do not have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes to the program to allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking to be made. our alternative, and i was just discussing this, we could basically eliminate or put a moratorium on our regular program, which is somewhat safer. the problem is we do not have that authority under that program to avoid the full-draw feature of it. the rig
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)